halfsquaretriangles:

Last term, I confided in a professor that I was struggling with anxiety attacks and depression. She seemed understanding.

A few weeks after the class ended, I learned that she had brought the issue up at an informal departmental gathering, telling grad students and professors that anxiety is often an “excuse” used by students who want an easy ride.

erica violet lee’s blog post “good philosophers don’t have anxiety attacks: on mental health, race, and belonging in the classroom” is important and scary and sad.

(via tarae)

durgapolashi:

Mamma Andersson TICK TOCK (2011)

durgapolashi:

Mamma Andersson TICK TOCK (2011)


Wassily Kandinsky, “Tanzkurven: Zu den Tänzen der Palucca,” Das Kunstblatt, Potsdam, vol. 10, no. 3 (1926)

Wassily Kandinsky, “Tanzkurven: Zu den Tänzen der Palucca,” Das Kunstblatt, Potsdam, vol. 10, no. 3 (1926)

(Source: theloudest--minds, via sylvides)

cassandragillig:

I made this for Dave

my major is [screencap of kanye west: everything in the world is exactly the same].

tagged communications degrees on a good day
“Against the urgency of people dying in the streets, what in God’s name is the point of cultural studies?…At that point, I think anybody who is into cultural studies seriously as an intellectual practice, must feel, on their pulse, its ephemerality, its insubstantiality, how little it registers, how little we’ve been able to change anything or get anybody to do anything. If you don’t feel that as one tension in the work that you are doing, theory has let you off the hook.”

Stuart Hall (via nuafam215)

This is from the essay “Cultural Studies and its Theoretical Legacies” and the pdf is here. #returntothesource2014

(Source: , via arabellesicardi)

hellomollyo:

image

Wrote a thing for The Awl about the 'unstated class war' in Brooklyn.

"My kind of service work is not the kind of service work that puts you in the back room washing dishes for 12-hour shifts for dollars because you are considered completely expendable. But my kind of service work is part of the same logic that indiscriminately razes neighborhoods. It outsources the emotional and practical needs of the oft-fetishized, urban-renewing “creative” workforce to a downwardly mobile middle class, reducing workers’ personality traits and educations to a series of plot points intended to telegraph a zombified bohemianism for the benefit of the rich.”

banji-realness:

Can we please talk about this montage and also bass riff

zoeozma:

my body is changing, go home (working title)
work in progress
polyester 
2014

zoeozma:

my body is changing, go home (working title)

work in progress

polyester 

2014

(via beetroots)

janetmock:

Spending the weekend in Sarasota with bell hooks who pushed me to take time off — even just for two days. 

"You and that phone, girl. Who are you texting with? No, it’s the camera! I’m not going to smile." -bell hooks




:’)

janetmock:

Spending the weekend in Sarasota with bell hooks who pushed me to take time off — even just for two days.

"You and that phone, girl. Who are you texting with? No, it’s the camera! I’m not going to smile." -bell hooks

:’)

(Source: lush-retina)

rgr-pop:

dorightwoman:

In her jeremiad against trigger warnings, which has received accolades from academics as famous as Jack Halberstam, Jenny Jarvie claims that to employ the language of triggering in college classrooms, we are “structuring public life around the most fragile personal sensitivities.” Jarvie foresees that such a gesture would “only restrict all our horizons,” but, I can’t help but think that the opposite effect would come about: to consider the needs of those most vulnerable first and foremost would foster all lives, not just those Jarvie sees as strong or fit. I think we must protect those who are fragile. To protect the weakest or frailest among us would mean that we would all be safe. Trigger warnings don’t shut down discourse. Rather, they open it up: a trigger warning is a recognition that survivors exist and an invitation for them to participate in conversations on their own terms. It is a gesture that acknowledges (“I see you”) and promises at least an attempt to be an ally (“I will try not to harm you”). To work on ending harm to others - what could be a better use of public life than that?

i m a g i n e

“Identities are formed at the unstable point where personal lives meet the narrative of history. Identity is an ever-unfinished conversation.”
Stuart Hall (1932-2014)

(Source: studiomuseum, via arabellesicardi)

(Source: radianthour)